art

New Podcast for Art Lovers

Friends! I got an email a few days ago that made me stop in my tracks: as soon as I read it, I knew instantly that I had to share this information with you.

Many of you out there are art lovers just as I am. Because we share a mutual love of art, it stands to reason that some of you may be interested in art careers as I am, too. However, not all of us want to be artists in the traditional sense: we want careers that allow us to surround ourselves with our but not necessarily be the creators of the art.

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That’s why I was so excited to see that Christie’s Education was launching a new podcast series titled Think Like an Art World Expert. This series, which will be available on Soundcloud, Stitcher, and Acast,  promises to give a behind-the-scenes view of different art jobs. Along with this behind-the-scenes view, different art world experts will be describing their individual career paths, as well as unexpected things about their jobs.

The series officially starts on January 23rd, 2019, but there’s a small preview available on SoundCloud now that I’m linking here. This series will be a must for anyone interested in working in the art world. It would also be great information for anyone that creates and sells art: there’s nothing like knowing the individuals you may have to work with as you make your art of available a larger customer base.

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Because I am so excited about this series, I will be doing episode reviews for the next few weeks. You can look for those reviews to come out either on Monday or  Tuesday after an episode airs: I haven’t quite decided which day yet.

Will you all be checking it out? Let me know in the comments below. I’m so excited about this: I can’t wait to discuss this series with you all! Talk to you all tomorrow.

 

life curation

Take This Course Before 2019

I know we’re all excited to start 2019 on a strong note, and I’m all for finding (and sharing!) the tools and resources to make this our best year ever. So, I’m going to do a mini-series called the 2019 Toolkit. This is informal, but as I find things that I think will be useful to you all, I’ll share them here and tag them for your convenience.

I’ve come across this particular course multiple times over the past six or so years, and each time I see it, I’m impressed by the high student ratings and continued popularity. Learning How to Learn, a course available through Coursera, is a powerful tool for setting the tone for 2019 successes. The class is 12 hours of study, so 30 minutes a Day is more than enough time to complete the course by the new year.

art

Art As Taught by the Smithsonian

I came across a fabulous Smithsonian Institute program that some of my fellow art lovers may want to check out.

“You love art. Now become the expert you’ve always wanted to be. Register in Smithsonian Associates Certificate Program in World Art History

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Well, with that lead in, who wouldn’t want to learn more about this program? This certificate program has 10 courses (four core courses and six electives) offered by the Smithsonian and you can take them at your leisure. You can start at any time and choose the courses that interest you as time goes along.

Even if you aren’t interested in completing the program, the opportunity to get instruction from the premiere staff employed by the Smithsonian is too good to pass up. Also, the chance to connect with fellow art enthusiasts who have decided to take their interests to the next level by enrolling in courses.

However, if you do enroll in the program, you get access to a “private Facebook group where you can interact with fellow students and pose questions to lecturers”. You will also get exclusive invitations to events at the institution. I’m considering enrolling in 2019, if inspiration leads me to it.

Have any of you had a chance to take some art courses, either online or in person? I’d love to hear about it! Let me know in the comments below. Take care!

art · life curation

The Dark Side of the Art World

As an art fanatic and insatiable autodidact, I stay on the lookout for interesting resources for learning more about the art world. My current favorite e-learning website, Future Learn, has yet another great course related to art. This time, the course dives into the dark side of the art world. Antiquities Trafficking and Art Crime “delve[s] into the seedy underbelly of the art world, looking at smuggling, theft, fakes, and fraud […]”.

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I don’t know about you, but this course sounds like it will be great for indulging my inner spy! So yes, I’ll be doing this course. Depending on how quickly I go through the materials, I may explore another Future Learn course before the end of summer. For now, though, I’m going to concentrate on this course.

Thinking about art crime, I remember watching a cute Audrey Hepburn movie years ago, about an art forger that was on the brink of getting caught. I can’t remember all of the details of the movie, but I may watch it again to refresh my memory. The movie is How to Steal a Million, and it’s starring Audrey Hepburn (as mentioned previously) and Peter O’Toole. From what I recall, it was a light and cute comedy, so you may want to check it out.

Anyhoo, that’s it for today. I’ve got some running around to do today but I’ll be back tomorrow. Ciao!

 

art · travel

Flashback to Kansas City, Pt. 2 – The Kemper and Nelson-Atkins Museums

I mentioned in a previous post that I had spent some time in Kansas City, MO and I thoroughly enjoyed the time I spent there. In that post, I mentioned that I visited 18th and Vine and I also went to the Jazz Museum there. This post discusses two different cultural institutions in Kansas City – the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

The Kemper Museum was, sadly, closed when I went. However, there was an enchanting outdoors sculpture garden that I photographed while I was there. Fun fact: while en route to the Kemper Museum, I saw a chipmunk for the first time (they aren’t as common in the area where I currently live). I enjoyed the sculpture garden so much that I vowed to return to Kemper and see the works inside of the museum. My return trip hasn’t happened yet, but I suspect that it won’t be much longer before that trip becomes a reality.

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Sculpture of Bellephoron taming Pegasus

The Crying Giant at the Kemper Museum

Spider Statue on the lawn of the Kemper Museum

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A much younger me posed under the giant spider

After leaving Kemper, I went to Nelson-Atkins, where I promptly fell in love with the meticulously maintained grounds and gardens. This was a very popular spot for newlyweds, as I saw at least 5 different wedding parties taking photographs on the lawn. I knew that these were different wedding parties because I counted the different colored bridesmaids dresses that I saw with each group!

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Exterior of Nelson-Atkins – it looked like one of DC’s museums

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Close up detailing on a vase on the exterior of the museum

Two of the famous giant shuttlecocks on the lawn of the Nelson Atkins Museum

Rodin’s The Thinker at the museum

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A view of the lawn

Unfortunately, I didn’t take any pictures inside of the museum, but I have a few from from the exterior. I would love to return to Kansas City and do a proper tour of both museums. Fingers crossed, I’ll be able to make that trip happen within a year!

culture · international

Fun With Portuguese

I slacked with my Portuguese studies but I recently got back into my routine and I’m excited about learning more of the language. For the record, I’m learning European Portuguese, since I expect to go to Portugal before I travel to Brazil. But let’s be honest: I’d take either location: I’m not picky about which one I visit first!

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Portuguese has a lot of words and definitions shared with Spanish, but make no mistake: studying Spanish isn’t enough to get by in Portuguese. Familiarity with any Romance language will help with Portuguese comprehension. I always breathe a sigh of relief when I see or hear a word and it means what I *think* it means.

Pronunciation, on the other hand, is a completely different animal. I’ve taken French and Spanish, and certain tricks of pronunciation elude me: the same occurs while I’m practicing Portuguese, too. I really love is the tendency to add a subtle “sh” sound at the end of some words ending in the letter “s”. It almost sounds like what most Americans would consider a lisp, though it’s actually a completely acceptable sound. In fact, disregarding the subtle “sh” would likely make it clear to any native speaker that you aren’t one of them.

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All of that being said, I love the sound of Portuguese, and I’m excited that I’m learning little phrases here and there. If I didn’t mention it before, I’ll mention it now: I’ll be sharing my language learning tools on this blog. For this post, I’ll be sharing one podcast that I’ve used to help me with learning Portuguese.

Portuguese with Carla has incredibly thorough language instruction and the lessons are long enough where you can really start “training your ear” to the language. Carla and her husband Marlon not only teach Portuguese but they also give neuroscientific tips, offering research and techniques related to improved language learning. I’ve been having a lot of fun listening to them and practicing along. I generally listen to the podcast but I also have checked out their companion YT channel, since I occasionally need to see what is being said so that I can get a better “feel” of the conversation. If you’re interested in learning Portuguese, I highly recommend this website/podcast/YT channel!

Here’s one of Carla’s videos, for your enjoyment:

food · international

Trying My Hand At Portuguese Food – Vegan Caldo Verde

I’m still studying the Portuguese language (more on that in a future post) but I know that part of learning about a culture includes exploring the cuisine. And, as a self-proclaimed foodie, I find that immersing myself into the culinary aspects of a culture does wonders for my overall excitement. So, I tried my hand at preparing a traditional Portuguese dish. Here’s my story about it.

I looked through various online sources to find out what makes up the bulk of the typical Portuguese diet. What I found was a lot of seafood and vegetable dishes, and a wide array of pastries. Fortunately, I love ALL of these, so I was excited. I wanted to start with something simple, so I decided to try making caldo verde, a traditional Portuguese soup that gets its signature green color from its sole green ingredient, kale.

Only one problem with caldo verde – it normally contains chourico (chorizo), a type of pork sausage. I don’t eat any pork, so I had to adjust the recipe. I tried making it twice, and both times turned out well, though my second attempt (using a combinations of Trader Joe’s soy chorizo and Field Roast Italian Sausage, though next time I’ll replace the Italian sausage with Field Roast Mexican Chipotle Sausage) was more of a success.

First try: caldo verde with Field Roast Italian Sausage only

I also used a blender, as opposed to mashing the potatoes by hand. It’s much easier for me to get the consistency I desire by using the blender. It also made the food prep portion easier – I could chop the potatoes and onions coarsely because the blender would take care of the rest of the work for me.

The soup is luscious, filling and very easy to make. It’s also pretty inexpensive: it contains a lot of common ingredients and can easily be tweaked for your taste. I’m going to share my recipe below, as well as the recipes I reviewed while coming up with my own version of caldo verde.

Second try – even tastier since I added the Trader Joe’s soy chorizo along with the Field Roast Italian Sausage slices

Caldo Verde (serves 6)

  • 1 yellow onion, chopped into large pieces
  • 1 tsp minced garlic (approximately 2-3 cloves)
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 6 gold potatoes, chopped into large pieces
  • 3 cups water
  • 3 cups veggie broth
  • 4 cups kale, chopped into bite-sized or smaller pieces
  • 1/2 pack Trader Joe’s soy chorizo, sliced to the size that you prefer (it’ll crumble up so the sizing doesn’t matter)
  • 1/4 – 1/2 pack Field Roast Sausage of your choice
  • salt and pepper
  • Add oil to a large pot, and warm over a medium heat. Add onions and garlic, and stir. Cook until translucent (about 4-6 minutes).
  1. Add potatoes, water and veggie broth to the pot. Stir to combine, cook until potatoes are soft (about 15-20 minutes).
  2. Turn off heat, and scoop out potatoes and onions, using a slotted spoon or straining spoon. Place potatoes and onions into a blender, along with some of the broth. Blend until smooth.
  3. Return blended ingredients to the pot, and stir well with the remaining broth. Add chopped kale, and cook over a low heat. Cook for 15 – 20 minutes, or until kale softens. Season with salt and pepper
  4. Add chopped sausage, and stir well. Warm for an additional 5 – 10 minutes (make sure the the sausage is heated thoroughly).
  5. Serve while hot.

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Close up of the finished product, second time around

I used AllRecipes, Olivia’s Cuisine and Leite’s Culinaria to create my recipe. Many thanks to them for such clear directions! I couldn’t have done it without their recipes as templates. Muito obrigada!