art · culture

Welcome Back, Smithsonian Institute!

I’m finally writing a post that I’ve wanted to write for weeks now: welcome back to the Smithsonian Institute! During what is officially the longest shutdown in US history, visitors had to go without this cultural treasure.The Smithsonian Institute (SI), along with the National Gallery of Art (NGA), are finally running again after shuttering their doors at the end of December. Even when several other federal agencies were furloughed, SI and NGA both made sure to continue operating until the end of the calendar year.

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It’s this commitment to the American public that really distinguishes these fine organizations. No one is happier to welcome them back that I am.

You’ve been missed.

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Art and its Appreciators Suffer During Government Shutdowns

Happy Thursday, friends! I hope that this Thursday sees you in good health and fantastic spirits. I wanted to post a quick update because, as you all may recall, a few weeks ago I posted about Smithsonian exhibitions that were scheduled to leave the museums in January 2019. I wanted to make sure you all knew the exhibitions that would be leaving soon so that you could take advantage of these before they left DC.

However, my post about the exhibitions came right before the government shutdown. I was not aware that the shutdown would be affecting  the Smithsonian Institution as well as the National Gallery of Art. As a federal employee, I’m aware of what a shutdown can do. I’m also aware that the Smithsonian is part of the federal government.  Despite knowing these things, I did not know that the shutdown would happen for such a long period of time. I also didn’t know to the extent that the Smithsonian would be affected.

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The Smithsonian Castle

Regrettably, while the shutdown continues, the Smithsonian and the National Gallery of Art are not available to serve the public who have funded them throughout the year. I regret that so many people will not be able to enjoy these fine museums until the government is up and running again. Fortunately for us, the Smithsonian and the National Gallery of Art have made many exhibitions viewable on their respective websites.  Yes, I know that websites don’t compared to viewing these treasures in person, but until the museums reopen, we’ll have to make do with what we have.

Let’s all send good vibrations to the hard-working staff of the Smithsonian and National Gallery of Art, who will not receive compensation while the shutdown is occurring. Let us also send good vibrations to the legislators who are trying their best to resolve the shutdown issue with as little negative impact to the workers as possible.

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Leaving Soon – Smithsonian Exhibitions Leaving in January 2019

Happy Sunday! It’s a dreary, rainy Sunday in central Virginia but here’s hoping the weather is more pleasant wherever you are.

If you are planning any trips to the Northern Virginia/District of Columbia/Maryland area during January 2019, then you’ll want to carve out a little time to visit the Smithsonian Institute, one of the most extensive museum collectives in the world. And, if you’re an art lover (like me), you’ll probably want to know which exhibitions are leaving so you won’t miss them during your visit.

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Visitors at the National Collection of Fine Arts touring a gallery of contemporary art by Unidentified Artist, Photo Blow-up, 1968, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C. (as seen in the Celebrating Fifty Years exhibition)

So, for your visiting convenience, here is a list of Smithsonian exhibitions slated to leave the Institute in January 2019. They are organized from early in January to the end of January, so you know which ones to check out first. Enjoy!

January 1 – In Memoriam: George Herbert Walker Bush (National Portrait Gallery)

January 4 – Pushing the Envelope: Mail Art from the Archives of American Art (Archives of American Art Lawrence A. Fleischman Gallery)

January 6 – Celebrating Fifty Years (National Portrait Gallery)

January 6 – UnSeen: Our Past in a New Light, Ken Gonzales-Day and Titus Kaphar (National Portrait Gallery)

January 6 – Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen (Smithsonian American Art Museum)

January 6 – Let’s Get It Right: Work Incentive Posters of the 1920s (National Museum of American History)

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One of the work posters in the Let’s Get It Right exhibition

January 21 – No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man (Renwick Gallery)

January 21 – Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs (Smithsonian American Art Museum)

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One of the prints shown at the Diane Arbus exhibition (Diane Arbus, A woman with her baby monkey, N.J. 1971)

January 24 – Japan Modern: Photography from the Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck Collection (Arthur M. Sackler Gallery [Sackler Gallery])

Daikon Embankment Woodblock print

Kawase Hasui, Daikon Embankment (from the series Twelve Scenes of Tokyo), 1920 (as featured in the Japan Modern exhibition at the Sackler Gallery)

January 24 – Japan Modern: Prints in the Age of Photography (Sackler Gallery)

January 27 – Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes (Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden)

 

I hope this list helps you plan a fun and art-filled trip to the Washington, DC area! Take care, and enjoy your Sunday!

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“See It Before It’s Gone” Art Exhibitions

Happy Tuesday, darlings! What would a new month be if I didn’t reflect on the upcoming exhibits coming to the area?

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Photograph featured in a tribute to Senator John S. McCain III at the National Portrait Gallery

Surprisingly, there are no exhibitions coming to any of the Smithsonian Museums this month. However, there are a few exhibitions ending this month. Here’s what I’ll be checking out in the next couple of weeks:

At the National Portrait Gallery:

In Memoriam: Senator John S. McCain III (ending on September 9th)

Celebrating Leonard Bernstein’s 100th Birthday (ending on September 23rd)

At the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden:

George Baselitz: Six Decades (ending on September 16th)

Tony Lewis: Anthology 2014 -2016 (ending on September 16th)

The Message: New Media Works (ending on September 30th)

It looks like I’m going to have some very busy days over the next few weeks, since I can’t seem to stay out of the Smithsonian and I love taking advantage of being so close to the museums. Look out for some review posts in the near future!

 

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Smithsonian Highlights – April

Hey friends! As you all know, it’s hard for me to stay out of the Smithsonian’s museums, because 1) I work right by several of them and 2) I’m addicted to art exhibits. I figured I would create a list of some of the Smithsonian’s highlights for the month of April. If you’re planning a trip to DC, or you are already in the area, here’s some of the must see/must do activities hosted by the Smithsonian Institute. 

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DIANE ARBUS: A BOX OF TEN PHOTOGRAPHS exhibit opens on April 6 at Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM). Arbus is credited as being the artist that elevated photography into a “serious” art discipline. Her photos bridged reality and artistry, and SAAM has a exhibit for us to enjoy for the remainder of 2018.

Marlene Dietrich: Dressed for the Image : I talked about this exhibit in this post. It will be leaving National Portrait Gallery (NPG) on April 15, 2018. You won’t want to miss this stunning and stirring photos of Dietrich. For those that don’t know, NPG is housed in the same building as SAAM, so from April 6 to April 15, you can check out A Box of Ten Photographs then swing by Dressed for the Image without missing a beat.

GALLERY EXPERIENCE: SLOW ART DAY April 14, 2018, 10:30 AM5:00 PM at the Hirshhorn Museum (and at pretty much every museum nationwide) If you can, stop by any art museum on April 14th to participate in Slow Art Day where, instead of rushing through the exhibits trying to absorb a little of everything, you can take your time and enjoy the art for the perspective-broadening experience that it is.

If this quick summary of the Smithsonian’s juiciest exhibits has been helpful, then I’ll be sure to make it a regular feature. Hope you enjoy!